Apollo 11

Apollo 11 was the first mission to land a man on the moon. It was launched on a Saturn V rocket at 9:32 am local time (EDT) on July 16, 1969 from Pad 39-A from Kennedy Space Center, Florida, Usa. Apollo 11 mission was the 5th manned mission in the Apollo Program. Apollo 11 crew was; Neil Armstrong (Commander), Edwin Buzz Aldrin (Lunar Modulate Pilot). Micheal Collins (Command Module Pilot), the back up crew was; James Lorell (Backup Commander), Fred Hanse (Backup Lunar Modulate Pilot) And William A. Anders (Backup Command Module Pilot). Apollo 11 mission had announced on January 1969, that 29 astronauts trained for the mission to the moon. Neil Armstrong was chosen as the commander and Edwin “buzz” was the lunar pilot and also Micheal Collins was the Command Module Pilot. The Astronauts blasted off on Saturn V. The Commander was called “Eagle”. The Launch weight of the Saturn V was 2,923,387 kg. The Total spacecraft weight was 46,678 kg; the command service module weighed 30,320 kg. The Tran lunar injection was at 12:16 pm, they docked at 12:56 pm and the spacecraft went into lunar orbit insertion at 1:21pm on July 19. The csm-lm separated at 2:11pm on July 20th.



About the Astronauts
NArmstrong was born on August 5, 1930. He lived on his grandparent’s farm in Auglaize County, Ohio. Armstrong Entered Purdue University in 1947 where he studied Aeronautical Engineering. Well within the two years of college he studied, but the United States Navy called him to active duty in 1949. Armstrong became a navy pilot and was sent to Korea in 1950, were he flew 78 combat missions Navy Jets Panther. Meanwhile in 1952 Armstrong returned to Purdue University where he earned his bachelor’s degree in Aeronautical engineering in 1955. From there Armstrong became a United States Astronaut, and also the First Man To Set Foot On The eil MOON!!!
  • Plaque (commemorates first manned landing)
  • Carried to Moon and returned two large American flags, flags of the 50 states, District of Columbia and U.S. Territories, flags of other nations and that of the United Nations.
  • MEPS (Modularized Equipment Stowage Assembly) containing TV camera to record first steps on Moon and EASEP (Early Apollo Science Equipment Package).
Highlights:
  • on the Moon, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin. First return of samples from another planetary body.
  • The prime mission objective of Apollo 11 is stated simply: "Perform a manned lunar landing and return".
  • First return of samples from another planetary body. These first samples were basalts, dark-colored igneous rocks, and they were about 3.7 billion years old.
  • Plaque affixed to the leg of the lunar landing vehicle signed by President Nixon, Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. The plaque bears a map of the Earth and this inscription:




In addition to their sample collection activities, the Apollo 11 crew performed several experiments on the lunar surface. The results of some of these experiments were either radioed to Earth by the crew or returned to Earth for laboratory analysis.
Other experiments were deployed by the crew and then monitored from Earth by radio telemetry after the crew departed. This group of experiments was termed the Early Apollo Scientific Experiment Package. It was less extensive than the experiments performed on later missions, both because of time restrictions on the EVA and because of limitations on the payload mass carried on the first landing attempt.
Apollo 11 Dataset Descriptions
The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) provides data and information on Apollo experiments upon request to individuals or organizations resident in the United States. The same services are available to scientists outside the United States through the World Data Center A for Rockets and Satellites. Normally, a charge is made for the requested data to cover the cost of reproduction and the processing of the request.
Catalog of Apollo Experiment Operations
This Johnson Space Center site catalogs each experiment and equipment item deployed or operated on the lunar surface during the Apollo program. It summarizes some of the general problems encountered with these experiments and provides guidelines for the design of future lunar surface experiments.
"Apollo 11 , LunarPlanteryInstitute.com"
In addition to their sample collection activities, the Apollo 11 crew performed several experiments on the lunar surface. The results of some of these experiments were either radioed to Earth by the crew or returned to Earth for laboratory analysis.
Other experiments were deployed by the crew and then monitored from Earth by radio telemetry after the crew departed. This group of experiments was termed the Early Apollo Scientific Experiment Package. It was less extensive than the experiments performed on later missions, both because of time restrictions on the EVA and because of limitations on the payload mass carried on the first landing attempt.
Apollo 11 Dataset Descriptions
The National Space Science Data Center (NSSDC) provides data and information on Apollo experiments upon request to individuals or organizations resident in the United States. The same services are available to scientists outside the United States through the World Data Center A for Rockets and Satellites. Normally, a charge is made for the requested data to cover the cost of reproduction and the processing of the request.
Catalog of Apollo Experiment Operations
This Johnson Space Center site catalogs each experiment and equipment item deployed or operated on the lunar surface during the Apollo program. It summarizes some of the general problems encountered with these experiments and provides guidelines for the design of future lunar surface experiments.